Marne Green Space

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Marne Green Space is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen communities that form the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. Located close to the Chinese Cemetery and Trafalger Park, Marne Green Space provides access to Gonzales Beach along its eastern shore. The beach access is rough and the beach in this area is mostly bedrocks covered in seaweeds. The name for the street has historical relevance. Marne, a department and river that lies to the east of Paris, France, was a significant battle during first world war that was victory for the Allies. Quimper Park, Repulse Green Space, the Abkhazi Gardens, Gonzales Hill Regional Park, Harling Point Green Space, Trafalger Park and Gonzales Beach Park, in Victoria, are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 24’ 29”  W123º 19’ 20”

Marne Green Space can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Turn right onto Foul Bay Road and continue along Foul Bay Road to reach King George Terrace. Make a left turn then immediately turn right onto Crescent Road and follow to Repulse Street. Turn onto Repulse Street then make a right turn onto Marne Street. The green space is at the end of the road.  There is limited street parking in this residential neighborhood.  City buses travel close to this park.

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Walbran Park

 

Walbran Park is in the community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen communities that form the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. Named after Captain John T. Walbran, a mariner and author of the nineteen o’nine book titled ‘British Columbia Coast Names’, Walbran Park has two sections: it hosts a cairn dedicated to explorations of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and a Second World War observation post.  The Board of Canada established a Historical Site Monument in the park in nineteen twenty-five. The plaque on the cairn indicates that in 1592 the Strait of Juan de Fuca was discovered but it took until 1787 before Charles William Barkley explored the area.  Later, in 1792, Captain George Vancouver explored the Strait and surrounding waterways for the British Government. The area was further explored when Captain Walbran, whom initially served on the British training ship HMS Conway, cruised the Strait of Georgia and areas aboard the SS Quadra. This section is about two hectares in size. Also Walbran Park, take in the breathtaking vista from the World War II platform observation post located across the street from the rock cairn.  The concrete platform provides a fantastic panoramic view of Oak Bay’s and Victoria’s hidden coves and bays. The platform has a metal nineteen step staircase and metal deck. This section, about one hectare in size, of the parkland is also composed of gneiss rock of the Coquitz and Weiss terranes. The rocks show some glacial striations and are mostly covered by mosses, lichens, grasses and springtime flowers. Small shrubs, mostly broom and a few Garry oak trees can also be found in this hilltop parkland. Gonzales Hill Regional Park and Sunny Green Space are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 24’ 42”  W123º 19’ 14”

Walbran Park can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Continue along Foul Bay Road to reach Fairfield Road. Turn left onto Fairfield Road and continue along to Denison Road. Turn right onto Denison Road and continue up the hill past the parking area for Gonzales Hill Regional Park to the end of the road. There is limited roadside parking along Denison Road.  City busses travel close to this park and the park can be access by walking up the trail and stepping up the 116 stairs near intersection of Sunny Lane and King George Terrace.  It is near a public beach access to McNeill (Shoal) Bay.

Taylor Green Space

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Taylor Green Space is in the District of Metchosin, a coastal community in the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. Located on the edge of Strait of Juan de Fuca, Taylor Beach is rock and cobble beach. It is between Witty’s Lagoon Regional Park and Devonian Regional Park. Mitchell Park with Seabluff Trail and Madrill Green Space are nearby.

Geographical location N48º 21’ 59” W123º 31’ 57”

Taylor Green Space can be reached from Highway 1, the TransCanada Hwy. Exit at the Millstream /Veteran Memorial Parkway overpass and head south along the Veteran Memorial Parkway to reach Latoria Road. Turn left onto Latoria Road and continue along to reach Metchosin Road. Turn right onto Metchosin Road and watch for the signs to Witty’s Lagoon Regional Park. Continue along Metchosin Road to Taylor Road. Turn left onto Taylor Road and continue down to the small parking area. City buses travel along Metchosin Road.

Francis View Park

Francis View Park

Francis View Park is located on a ridge and overlooks the Trans Canada Highway, the estuary of Mill Stream in Esquimalt Harbour and southward to the Olympic Mountains of Washington State, USA. The park is under the hydroelectric towers that supply electricity to the substation located in View Royal, B.C. The southern border of the park is along an abbreviated section of Watkiss Way and has a cedar split fence and rock wall. A steep rough pathway leads to the grassy area at the top. This trail is bordered by broom, blackberries and small Garry oak trees. The highest point in the parkland is near the concrete and gravel pathway from Francis View Drive. A small grass covered area is near the bench close to the hydroelectric tower.  Evelyn Heights Park, Burnside Watkiss Park, Eagle View Elementary School Green Space, Burnside Road Green Space, Galloping Goose Trail – View Royal, Craigflower Creek Park and Game Nature Park are nearby.

 

Geographical location N48° 27’ 59” W123° 26’ 53”

 

Francis View Park can be accessed from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy 1. Exit onto Burnside Road West using exit #10 and follow the road as it curves up to the right. At the intersection with Watkiss Way, turn left onto Watkiss Way. Immediately turn right to access the homes along the northside of Watkiss Way. There is limited street parking along this section of the road. Alternatively continue along Watkiss Way to reach Francis View Drive. The park is near the top of the hill on the right. There is limited street side parking. A city bus route is along Watkiss Way.

Holland Point Park

Holland Point Park 6 Holland Point Park pond reflection

Holland Point Park is a water front park in Victoria, B.C, along the Strait of Juan de Fuca in the Salish Sea. It encompasses over five hectares within the James Bay community. The concrete sidewwalk along Dallas Road from Douglas to Boyd Street is about a thousand meters. This roadside sidewalk is often left to the uninitiated as the paved ridge trail, only a hundred meters longer, is refreshing, both for the view and the west winds. If you enjoy an even more scenic and adventurous route, follow the shoreline when the tide is low enough. The length of this lower route can be up to several hundred meters longer due to the staircases and sloped access points to the ridge trail. This popular nature park has many benches along the ridge pathway. Views from the ridge are across waters near Brotchie Ledge to the Olympic Mountains in Washington State, USA. The landscape on the ridge is mostly uncut grass covered area with a few trails mowed though it. The trees are mostly small elms intermixed with Himalayan blackberries and wild rose bushes. There are also several Garry oak and shore pine trees.

Holland Point Park borders along Beacon Hill Park near Mile Zero and Finlayson Point. Named after a seaman and school teacher George Holland, Holland Point Park hosts a small duck pond, called the Model Yacht Pond; it is a sight to see the various remotely navigated ships, tugs and vessels ply the waters of the pond. There are picnic tables and play equipment as well as toilets. The expanse of the Holland Point Park is a meadow with tall grasses and is adorned with the paired outdoor art works called the glass-half-full completed by artist Tyler Hodgins. Odgen Point Walkway, MacDonald Park, Todd Park, Lewis Street Park, Lewis Twentysix Green Space, Menzies Sixtyfour Green Space and Beacon Hill Park  are nearby should you have more time to explore the James Bay community.

Geographic coordinates N48° 24′ 34” W123° 22′ 22″

Holland Point Park can be reached from Blanchard Street. Continue onto Belleville Street as Blanchard Street curves toward Douglas Street. Turn left onto Douglas Street and follow to Dallas Road. At Dallas Road turn right and go about three blocks to see the small pond. There is limited roadside parking along Dallas Road. City buses travels through James Bay area near this park.

Finlayson Point – Beacon Hill Park

Finlayson Point – Beacon Hill Park lies in the southern border of City of Victoria. Form from felsic rocks and glacial till this point projects into the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Salish Sea. It is smaller than Clover Point, to the east. Holland Point is further west. Finlayson Point’s seaside bluffs, composed of mostly glacial till overlain with dark soils, of Beacon Hill Park merge with the shoreline of Clover Point Park and Holland Point Park. The grasslands of the ridge along Dallas Road shaded by a few large Garry oak and horse chestnut trees. The shore line shrubs are mostly composed of an elm species and few snowberry and alder bushes.

 

There are two main footpaths to stroll along while enjoying the spectacular panoramic view of the ocean with Washington State’s Olympic Mountain range as the backdrop. A flat paved eight hundred and eighty meter long pathway lies along the ridge within Beacon Hill. Bordered by the grasslands that contain camas and other flowers this area is one of six parks that permits dogs to be off leash in the City of Victoria. Be aware of exuberant canines bounding around. This is a very popular place to see dogs of all types as well as their owners.

 

The slightly quieter beach route can be accessed from near Cook Street via a stair case formed out of the old military weapons battery as well as a rough trail near Finlayson Point. The cobble and gravel beach stretches from Finlayson Point to Clover Point about a kilometer. Access to the waters in Horseshoe Bay, a small sandy bay immediately west of Finlayson Point, is via the rough trail off the point. There are many benches and several picnic tables along the pathways in this section of Beacon Hill Park. Mile Zero – Beacon Hill Park, Holland Point Park and South Park

Geographic coordinates N48° 24′ 24” W123° 21′ 52″

Finlayson Point – Beacon Hill Park can be reached from Blanchard Street. Stay on Blanchard Street as it merges with Douglas Street near Southgate and Superior streets. This marks the western corner of the parkland. Continue along Douglas Street to the junction with Dallas Road and Battery Street. Turn left onto Dallas Road and look for the angled roadside parking. City buses travel to the park from downtown Victoria.

Hollywood Crescent Green Space

Hollywood Crescent GS

Hollywood Crescent Green Space has a concrete pathway that to the rocky shore between Gonzales Bay and Ross Bay. The view of yachts and ships on the Salish Sea is excellent. On clear days you can see across the Strait of Juan de Fuca toward the Olympic Mountains of Washington State, USA. The green space appears to be the driveway for 1807 so stay close the fence line. The wooden staircase to the beach leads to small platform and then on the rocky shoreline. Try to arrive at low tide to explore the intertidal zone. This is also a cool place to storm watch.

Geographic coordinates N48° 24′ 32” W123° 19′ 52″

Hollywood Crescent Green Space can be reached from Blanchard Street. Turn east onto Fairfield Road and follow along to Robertson Street in Fairfield, about a block before Richmond Avenue. Turn right onto Robertson Street which curves to become Hollywood Crescent. The green space is between 1807 and 1811 Hollywood Crescent. There is limited roadside parking. City buses travel along Fairfield Road from downtown Victoria.