Harling Point Green Space

Chinesecemetarysign2

Harling Point Green Space is in the community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen communities that form the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. The green space is formed by a promontory that projects into the Strait of Juan de Fuca which is part of the Salish Sea. the green is along the perimeter of a cemetery that is known as the Chinese Cemetery at Harling Point and is a National Historic Site of Canada since 1996.   There are several interpretive panels that discuss the cultural history, geology and some natural history of the area. The cemetery was opened in 1903 and is maintained by the Chinese Benevolent Association. The cemetery, a feng shui site, contains gravestones of the early Chinese residents and was closed in 1950.  The twin pillars of the stone altar are frequently decorated with incense and flowers.

Wild flowers carpet this attractive green space in the spring time.  The cemetery lies on a flat promontory that is along the shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca.  The green space includes the rough pathway along the perimeter and the high tide line that makes for a shoreline rough walk. The walkway strolls across the fault line of two ancient terraines, Wrangellia and Leech River, as noted by the change in color from the pale green to the dark color basalt rocks. The shore line has several glacier erratics that further protect the green space. The waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca forming part of the Salish Sea provide a beautiful setting for the Olympic Mountains of Washington State. Harling Point was named after a brave local dentist who lost his life trying to save a family whom were tossed in from a small boat by waves during a storm. The shoreline hosts some good tide-pools and it is lovely place to watch sunrises and sunsets. There are a few benches within this green space. Gonzales Park, Gonzales Hill Regional Park, Quimper Park and Trafalger Park are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 24’ 24”  W123º 19’ 25”

Harling Green Space can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Continue along Foul Bay Road to reach Fairfield Road. Turn left onto Fairfield Road and continue along to King George Terrace. Turn left onto Crescent Road and follow to the end. Or turn right onto Penzance Road and continue to the end.  There is limited off street parking.  City buses travel close to this park.

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McNeill (Shoal) Bay Park

McNeill Park east

McNeill (Shoal) Bay Park is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of the thirteen communities in the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. This park is a long park that follows the shore line of the bay. Named after Captain W.H. McNeill in 1838, who pleased to find after months of exploring forest-clogged coast, a great sweep of golden grassland interspersed with stands of Garry Oak.  The bay provides views of the lighthouse on Trial Island, Kitty Islet, Anderson Hill Park and Walbran Park.  The Olympic Mountains form a panoramic backdrop.  From the southwestern end of the beach, there is a trail that leads to Walbran Park.  Close to Blueberry (Anderson) Hill, McNeill Bay is a cobble and rocky beach that is open to the south winds yet is a great starting point for a walk to either park. The shoreline is lined with a concrete barrier that is terranced an curved to limit erosion by the Salish Sea.

Geographic Location N48º 24’ 45”  W123º 18’ 53”

McNeil Bay Park can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Continue along Foul Bay Road to reach Fairfield Road. Turn left onto Fairfield Road and continue along to Beach Drive. Turn left onto Beach Drive and continue along the shore McNeill Bay. Parking is limited on Beach Drive City busses provide access off of Transit Road.

Kitty Islet Park

Kitty Islet Park

Kitty Islet Park is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen areas of the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. Venture onto the glacial smooth granodiorite outcropping that projects into Enterprise Channel when you visit this promontory. Located on the eastern shore of McNeill Bay, the half a hectare parkland is a nature developed park with a staircase that leads to a rough footpath. A monument notes a dedication to this site that was once called Tliwaynung, a Songhees seasonal site. The fifteen step concrete staircase leads to cobble and sand beach. The pair of Adirondack chairs, placed on the outcropping, provides a seat for a priceless view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca of the Salish Sea. The backdrop is formed by the Olympic Mountains in Washington State.  Trial Islands with the lighthouse built in nineteen o six are about one hundred meters away. It is the deep water and tidal currents of Enterprise Channel that limit access to the ecological reserve. Andersen Hill Park, Walbran Park, Monterey Middle School Green Space and Lafayette Park are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 24’ 38”  W123º 18’ 25”

Kitty Islet Park can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Continue along Foul Bay Road to reach Fairfield Road. Turn left onto Fairfield Road and continue to Beach Drive. Turn left onto Beach Drive and look for the islet across the bay. Street parking is available.  A couple of city buses provide access near Lafayette Park.

Queen’s Park, Oak Bay

 

Queen’s Park is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen areas of the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. This park is along the shoreline of Oak Bay, the shallow protected bay that holds the Oak Bay marina. It was initially known as Marina Park. The park has several benches and a unique swing bench that are wonderful places to soak up the view of Chatham and Discovery Islands and Mount Baker of the Washington State. The outdoor art is a pack of steel-welded wolves in pursuit of the cutout of an alert buck or perhaps designed to prevent Canadian Geese from eating the grass. The Hunt was design by Ken Hall and is part of the Arts Alive that helps create permanent outdoor art in Oak Bay. The park is a popular seasonal bird watching site that is part of the Migratory Bird Sanctuary created in nineteen twenty three.  Haynes Park, Turkey Head Walkway and Windsor Park are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 25’ 28”  W123º 18’ 17”

Queen’s Park can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Continue along Foul Bay Road to reach Oak Bay Avenue. Turn left onto Oak Bay Avenue and continue as it becomes Newport Street. Turn left onto Windsor Road to reach Beach Drive. The park is across from the intersection.  There is sign along the roadway. There is a parking area near the Oak Bay Marina and some street parking along Beach Drive. City buses travel to the marina.

Turkey Head Walkway and Mary Todd Islet

 

20180127_115100Turkey Head Walkway and Mary Tod Islet is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen areas of the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. Watch and feed the seals that inhabit in the ocean waters near the Oak Bay Marina from the Turkey Head Walkway. This boardwalk starts near the bus stop goes around the perimeter of the parking lot. The boardwalk section provides fun views of the marina and ramp to access the docks. A small bistro is found along here and outdoor seating to enjoy a snack. There are twenty wood steps to stroll up to reach the concrete foot path. The concrete sidewalk forms the rest of the Turkey Head walkway. The walkway was created when the breakwater was formed in nineteenfiftynine. There are several benches along this section and a lovely outdoor art creation. The views of the islands in the Salish Sea are breathtaking.  At the site of the old Oak Bay Aquarium, Several beach access points with concrete steps down to seashore are found here.  These access points are a favorite for kayakers and other personal water crafters who want to explore the islets and water ways of Oak Bay and the Salish Sea.

Mary Todd Islet (named in eighteen fifty six), locally known as the Turkey Head and Jimmy-Jenny Chickens’ Island (from a local eccentric who dwelled there at the turn of nineteen-hundreds), forms a natural part of the rocky breakwater for Oak Bay Marina.  It lies near the outer breakwater of the Marina.  The three hectare islet is named for the second daughter of John Todd of the Hudson Bay Company. There are several small trees and shrubs on the island with a sheltered sandy beach on its southwest shore. It is only accessible by boat.

Geographic Location N48º 25’ 25”  W123º 18’ 10”

Turkey Head Walkway can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Turn left off Foul Bay onto Cadboro Bay Road and take the first right turn immedicately after the high school onto Canmore Street. Follow Canmore Street to Beach Drive. Turn right ton Beach Drive and continue along to the parking area for the marina. The walkway traces a u-shaped around the parking lot.There is street parking. City buses travel along Foul Bay Road.

You can get to Turkey Head Walkway and the Marina from Oak Bay Avenue to Beach Drive.  Ample parking can be found the lot near the Marina and Restaurant.

Start your walk at the bridge at Beach Drive and walk on the tidal beach or on the sidewalk.  Continue along the sidewalk to Haynes Park, in about 30 minutes, or Willow Beach Park, in about 60 minutes. Several buses provide service to close to this park.

Haynes Park

Haynes Park is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen areas of the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. The rock and cobble beach that borders the seashore of Haynes Park is a favorite for bird watchers. A concrete staircase leads to the rocky beach.  The waters are part of Oak Bay, the large area of water that forms the sheltered area west of Mary Tod Islet in the Salish Sea. The sheltered bay is filled with moored boats and other vessels that are moored to the docks of Oak Bay Marina.  Many of the vessels provide usable platforms for blue herons to display their patience while fishing.  The park lawn is interspersed with Garry Oak trees.  A swing set, park benches, and beach accesses, including a limited access boat ramp, are also found in the park.  Glenlyon School playground is near the school’s boathouse off the north end of Haynes Park. This park was named for Arthur Edward Haynes a former accountant, real estate agent and an alderman of the inaugural Oak Bay Council in nineteen o’six. A couple of benches, a picnic table and water fountain on found here. Oak Bay Green Space, Willows’ Beach Park and Windsor Park are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 25’ 35”  W123º 18’ 27”

Haynes Park can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Turn right at the traffic lights on to Cadboro Bay Road. Turn left off Cadboro Bay Road onto Bowker Avenue. Follow Bowker to reach Beach Drive. Turn left onto Beach Drive and look for Haynes Park near the junction with Beresford Place. There is limited street parking. City buses travel along Beach Drive periodically.

Rutland Green Space

Rutland Green Space is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of the thirteen regions in the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. A rough pedestrian footpath leads through a thicket of blackberry and snowberry bushes to the rocky foreshore bordering on the Salish Sea. Overlooking Discovery and Chatham islands, a seven step concrete staircase leads to the large rocks that form the beach at Rutland Green Space. Uplands Park and Loon Bay Park are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 26’ 35”  W123º 17’ 33”

Rutland Green Space can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue to the end of Lansdowne and turn left onto Beach Drive. Follow Beach Drive to reach Rutland Road which will be on the right. Turn onto Rutland Road and continue to the turn-a-bout at the end. The pathway is just past the utility structures. There is limited street parking. City buses travel along Beach Drive periodically.