Repulse Green Space

20180604_141611

Repulse Green Space is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen communities that form the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. Located close to the Chinese Cemetery and Trafalger Park, Repulse Green Space provides rough access to the eastern shore of Gonzales Bay. The foot path is between the thick hedges and leads to a small rocky area. This area of the shore line for Gonzales Bay is rocky and mostly covered with seaweeds. Repulse Street may refer to the Her Majesty’s Ship Repulse, a battle cruiser of the Royal Navy that warded off attackers. Quimper Park, the Abkhazi Gardens, Gonzales Hill Regional Park, Harling Point Green Space, Trafalger Park and Gonzales Beach Park, in Victoria, are near by.

Geographic Location N48º 24’ 29”  W123º 19’ 20”

Repulse Green Space can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Turn right onto Foul Bay Road and continue along Foul Bay Road to reach King George Terrace. Make a left turn then immediately turn right onto Crescent Road and follow to Repulse Street. The green space is at the end of the road between the residential homes.  There is limited street parking in this residential neighborhood.  City buses travel close to this park.

Advertisements

Turkey Head Walkway and Mary Todd Islet

 

20180127_115100Turkey Head Walkway and Mary Tod Islet is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen areas of the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. Watch and feed the seals that inhabit in the ocean waters near the Oak Bay Marina from the Turkey Head Walkway. This boardwalk starts near the bus stop goes around the perimeter of the parking lot. The boardwalk section provides fun views of the marina and ramp to access the docks. A small bistro is found along here and outdoor seating to enjoy a snack. There are twenty wood steps to stroll up to reach the concrete foot path. The concrete sidewalk forms the rest of the Turkey Head walkway. The walkway was created when the breakwater was formed in nineteenfiftynine. There are several benches along this section and a lovely outdoor art creation. The views of the islands in the Salish Sea are breathtaking.  At the site of the old Oak Bay Aquarium, Several beach access points with concrete steps down to seashore are found here.  These access points are a favorite for kayakers and other personal water crafters who want to explore the islets and water ways of Oak Bay and the Salish Sea.

Mary Todd Islet (named in eighteen fifty six), locally known as the Turkey Head and Jimmy-Jenny Chickens’ Island (from a local eccentric who dwelled there at the turn of nineteen-hundreds), forms a natural part of the rocky breakwater for Oak Bay Marina.  It lies near the outer breakwater of the Marina.  The three hectare islet is named for the second daughter of John Todd of the Hudson Bay Company. There are several small trees and shrubs on the island with a sheltered sandy beach on its southwest shore. It is only accessible by boat.

Geographic Location N48º 25’ 25”  W123º 18’ 10”

Turkey Head Walkway can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Continue along Lansdowne Road to reach Foul Bay Road. Turn left off Foul Bay onto Cadboro Bay Road and take the first right turn immedicately after the high school onto Canmore Street. Follow Canmore Street to Beach Drive. Turn right ton Beach Drive and continue along to the parking area for the marina. The walkway traces a u-shaped around the parking lot.There is street parking. City buses travel along Foul Bay Road.

You can get to Turkey Head Walkway and the Marina from Oak Bay Avenue to Beach Drive.  Ample parking can be found the lot near the Marina and Restaurant.

Start your walk at the bridge at Beach Drive and walk on the tidal beach or on the sidewalk.  Continue along the sidewalk to Haynes Park, in about 30 minutes, or Willow Beach Park, in about 60 minutes. Several buses provide service to close to this park.

Haynes Park

Haynes Park is in the seaside community of Oak Bay, one of thirteen areas of the Capital Regional District of British Columbia. The rock and cobble beach that borders the seashore of Haynes Park is a favorite for bird watchers. A concrete staircase leads to the rocky beach.  The waters are part of Oak Bay, the large area of water that forms the sheltered area west of Mary Tod Islet in the Salish Sea. The sheltered bay is filled with moored boats and other vessels that are moored to the docks of Oak Bay Marina.  Many of the vessels provide usable platforms for blue herons to display their patience while fishing.  The park lawn is interspersed with Garry Oak trees.  A swing set, park benches, and beach accesses, including a limited access boat ramp, are also found in the park.  Glenlyon School playground is near the school’s boathouse off the north end of Haynes Park. This park was named for Arthur Edward Haynes a former accountant, real estate agent and an alderman of the inaugural Oak Bay Council in nineteen o’six. A couple of benches, a picnic table and water fountain on found here. Oak Bay Green Space, Willows’ Beach Park and Windsor Park are nearby.

Geographic Location N48º 25’ 35”  W123º 18’ 27”

Haynes Park can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway. Continue along the Hwy 1 into Victoria as it becomes Douglas Street. Turn off Douglas onto Hillside Avenue to head east. Stay on Hillside Avenue as it becomes Lansdowne Road. Turn right at the traffic lights on to Cadboro Bay Road. Turn left off Cadboro Bay Road onto Bowker Avenue. Follow Bowker to reach Beach Drive. Turn left onto Beach Drive and look for Haynes Park near the junction with Beresford Place. There is limited street parking. City buses travel along Beach Drive periodically.

Finlayson Point – Beacon Hill Park

Finlayson Point – Beacon Hill Park lies in the southern border of City of Victoria. Form from felsic rocks and glacial till this point projects into the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Salish Sea. It is smaller than Clover Point, to the east. Holland Point is further west. Finlayson Point’s seaside bluffs, composed of mostly glacial till overlain with dark soils, of Beacon Hill Park merge with the shoreline of Clover Point Park and Holland Point Park. The grasslands of the ridge along Dallas Road shaded by a few large Garry oak and horse chestnut trees. The shore line shrubs are mostly composed of an elm species and few snowberry and alder bushes.

 

There are two main footpaths to stroll along while enjoying the spectacular panoramic view of the ocean with Washington State’s Olympic Mountain range as the backdrop. A flat paved eight hundred and eighty meter long pathway lies along the ridge within Beacon Hill. Bordered by the grasslands that contain camas and other flowers this area is one of six parks that permits dogs to be off leash in the City of Victoria. Be aware of exuberant canines bounding around. This is a very popular place to see dogs of all types as well as their owners.

 

The slightly quieter beach route can be accessed from near Cook Street via a stair case formed out of the old military weapons battery as well as a rough trail near Finlayson Point. The cobble and gravel beach stretches from Finlayson Point to Clover Point about a kilometer. Access to the waters in Horseshoe Bay, a small sandy bay immediately west of Finlayson Point, is via the rough trail off the point. There are many benches and several picnic tables along the pathways in this section of Beacon Hill Park. Mile Zero – Beacon Hill Park, Holland Point Park and South Park

Geographic coordinates N48° 24′ 24” W123° 21′ 52″

Finlayson Point – Beacon Hill Park can be reached from Blanchard Street. Stay on Blanchard Street as it merges with Douglas Street near Southgate and Superior streets. This marks the western corner of the parkland. Continue along Douglas Street to the junction with Dallas Road and Battery Street. Turn left onto Dallas Road and look for the angled roadside parking. City buses travel to the park from downtown Victoria.

Wildwood Avenue Green Space

Wildwood Avenue GSThe view of yachts and ships on the Salish Sea is excellent from Wildwood Avenue Green Space. On most days you can see across the Strait of Juan de Fuca toward the Olympic Mountains of Washington State, USA. This green space is formed from the road right of way of Wildwood Avenue. The concrete sidewalk and pathway leads to the rocky shore between Gonzales Bay and Ross Bay. Pass by the shore pine trees to the twenty step concrete staircase that leads to small concrete platform with a handrail. A few more steps brings you to the granite rocks on shore. Try to arrive at low tide to explore the intertidal zone. This is also a cool place to storm watch but not so great to launch a kayak or paddle board.

Geographic coordinates N48° 24′ 42” W123° 19′ 49″

Wildwood Avenue Green Space can be reached from Blanchard Street. Turn east onto Fairfield Road and follow along to Wildwood Avenue in Fairfield, about a block after St Charles Street. Turn right onto Wildwood Avenue and continue to Hollywood Crescent. The beach access is between 1659and 1661Hollywood Crescent where there is limited roadside parking. City buses travel along Fairfield Road from downtown Victoria.

Hollywood Crescent Green Space

Hollywood Crescent GS

Hollywood Crescent Green Space has a concrete pathway that to the rocky shore between Gonzales Bay and Ross Bay. The view of yachts and ships on the Salish Sea is excellent. On clear days you can see across the Strait of Juan de Fuca toward the Olympic Mountains of Washington State, USA. The green space appears to be the driveway for 1807 so stay close the fence line. The wooden staircase to the beach leads to small platform and then on the rocky shoreline. Try to arrive at low tide to explore the intertidal zone. This is also a cool place to storm watch.

Geographic coordinates N48° 24′ 32” W123° 19′ 52″

Hollywood Crescent Green Space can be reached from Blanchard Street. Turn east onto Fairfield Road and follow along to Robertson Street in Fairfield, about a block before Richmond Avenue. Turn right onto Robertson Street which curves to become Hollywood Crescent. The green space is between 1807 and 1811 Hollywood Crescent. There is limited roadside parking. City buses travel along Fairfield Road from downtown Victoria.

Crescent Road Green Space

Stunning water views are seen from this linear green space. It hosts a pathway beside a large arbutus and a couple of Douglas fir trees. The pathway is a wide slope concrete sidewalk to a concrete fifteen step staircase that leads to the sandy shores of Gonzales Beach. Foul Bay Road Green space is a couple of houses to the east and Gonzales Beach can also be accessed from Ross Street a few houses west along Crescent Road.

Geographic coordinates N48° 24′ 43” W123° 19′ 41″

Crescent Road Green Space can be reached from Blanchard Street. Turn east onto Fairfield Road and follow along to Foul Bay Road. Turn right onto Foul Bay and then right onto Crescent Road. The green space is at 1849 Crescent Road where there is limited roadside parking along. City buses travel along Fairfield Road from downtown.