Selwyn Cedarvale Green Space

Selwyn Cedarvale Green Space is in the Mill Hill neighborhood of Langford, B.C. This rough seventy meter long footpath from Selwyn Road connects to the trails in Cedar Vale Park. The gravel pathway is border by patches of Himalayan blackberries that grow beside the fences. The trail crosses over the tunnel that protects Mill Stream as it passes under the Trans Canada Highway. Eventually the pathway branches as it reaches Cedarvale Park. There are some tall western red cedar trees that grow along the banks of Mill Stream in Cedarvale Park. The route that continues along toward Jeannie Park is shaded by deciduous trees like cottonwood and big leaf maples as well as a few Garry oak trees. Cedarvale Park, Jeannie Park, Mill Park, Olympia Glacier Green Space and Welwyin Fall Park are nearby.

Geographic location N48° 27’26” W123° 29’ 12”

Selwyn Cedarvale Green Space can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy1. Turn at Veteran Memorial Parkway/Millstream Road and turn south to head toward downtown Langford. Take the first left onto Strandlund Avenue and continue to the left to stay on Strandlund Avenue. At the junction with Selwyn Road turn left. Look for the footpath next to the concrete wood-like and chain link fences that lies near the Trans Canada Highway. There is limited roadside parking this area which is beside the Kingdom Hall.

Advertisements

Golden Spike Green Space

Golden Spike Green Space is in the Goldstream Meadows neighborhood of Langford, B.C. This green space, formed over an old gravel pit, is bordered by a chain-link fence and has a gravel trail that leads down the slope to the West Shore Parkway. There are several parks nearby including Mt Wells Regional Park, Turner’s Bog Park, Harlequin Park, Goldstream River Provincial Park, Kettle Creek Park and Langford Lake’s Ed Nixon Trail. This green space is frequented by dog walkers, runners and hikers who stroll along the trails for Langford Lake.

Geographic location N48° 27’3” W123°32’29”

Golden Spike Green Space can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy1. Turn at the West Shore Parkway and continue straight out the roundabout traffic circle. Look for the green space on the right at the junction with Landing Lane. There is limited roadside parking this area.

Kettle Creek Park

Kettle Creek Park is the Goldstream Meadows neighborhood of Langford, B.C. This park is bordered by a chain link fence to the north and fences of family homes to the south. There are several shore pine trees, rose bushes and deciduous trees in this grassy landscaped park. A couple of picnic tables along the gravel pathway complete the space. Gold Stream Provincial Park, Mt Wells Regional Park, Harlequin Park, Goldstream Meadows Park, Langford Lake Park and several green spaces are nearby.

Geographic location N48° 27’9” W123°32’33”

Kettle Creek Park can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy1. Turn at the West Shore Parkway and continue through the traffic circle. Make a left onto Kettle Lake Road and then a right onto Kettle Creek Crescent. The park is on the left near the rise of the road. There is roadside parking this area.

Goldstream Meadows Park

Goldstream Meadows Park is a wetland area in the Goldstream neighborhood of Langford, B.C. This wetland park lies on the northwestern end of Langford Lake and is also the name for warehouse buildings in this area. The park has two main trails: Henson Trail and Ed Nixon Trail. It also borders along Langford Lake Park. Henson Trail lies along the northeastern side of this park while the boardwalk of the Ed Nixon Trail lies along the southeastern side of the park. Most of the park is inaccessible. Amy Pond Park, Turner’s Bog Park, Gold Stream Provincial Park, Mt Wells Regional Park, Harlequin Park, Goldstream Meadows Park, Langford Lake Park and several green spaces are nearby.

Geographic location N48° 27’17” W123°32’32”

Goldstream Meadows Park can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy1. Turn at the West Shore Parkway and look for Henson Trail at this intersection. The closest parking is just past the traffic circle along Kettle Creek Drive beside Turner’s Bog Park. There is limited roadside parking this area.

Ravenview Park

Raven View Park is in the Goldstream neighborhood of Langford, B.C. About a hectare in size, Raven View Park is roughly an L-shaped parkland with a small ephemeral creek. This park borders on private acreages and Mount Well Regional Park. This nature park has several large cedar, Douglas fir and big leaf maple trees and lies on the eastern side of Mt Wells Park. From Raven View Drive, a rough dirt and rock pathway leads down a gravel slope to set of five stairs and on ward to lead across a small wooden bridge. The trail branches and leads along both sides of the into the Douglas fir and arbutus forest. The trails are unsigned although various colors of flagging tape can be seen. Perhaps you spot a raven on your visit in this peaceful park in your backyard. The trail in this parkland does connect with trails in Mt Wells Park as well as pathways in green spaces from Glenshire Drive and Awsworth Road. Irwin Park lies to the northeast.

Geographic location N48° 26’25” W123°32”56”

Raven View Park can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy1. Turn at West Shore Parkway and turn right onto Amy Road which merges to become Sooke Lake Road. Continue along SLR to turn left onto Humpback Road. Follow Humpback Road up over the railway track turn onto Irwin Road. Continue along Irwin Road and onto Creekside Trail. This road curves up the hill to Raven View Drive. The trail access to the park is marked with a discrete sign. There is limited roadside parking this area.

Humpback Sooke Flowline Green Space

The Humpback Sooke Flowline Green Space is in the Goldstream neighborhood of Langford, B.C. This green space is a thirty meter wide right of way with a trail along the top of the one and half meter diameter pipe. The water pipe, which was forty four kilometers long, was disconnected in nineteen seventy and now makes for a fun yet precarious walk. This two and a half kilometer section of the Sooke Flowline lies within Langford is from the reservoir on Humpback Road to Sooke Road. The water pipe was used to transport water from the Sooke Reservoir to help create the balancing Humpback Reservoir in nineteen fifteen. Humpback Reservoir covers thirteen and half hectares of the sloping valley that probably held a small creek that flowed into Parkland Creek, a tributary of Colwood Creek. Sections of this green space are enclosed within the Greater Victoria Water Area and Mt Wells Regional Park. Much of the pipe line is moss covered and becoming part landscape of the Douglas fir and arbutus forest. This is an unusual place to explore in your backyard. Irwin Park, Ravenview Park and Cressida Park are nearby.

Geographic location N48° 26’52” W123°33’17” at Mt Wells parking area

Humpback Sooke Flowline Green Space can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy1. Turn at West Shore Parkway and turn right onto Amy Road which merges to become Sooke Lake Road. Continue along SLR to turn left onto Humpback Road. Follow Humpback Road up over the railway track and past the junction with Irwin Road and look for the parking lot for Mount Wells Park on the left. This is the best place to park since Humpback Road is rather narrow as it winds through the area to connect with Sooke Road. There is limited roadside parking this area.

Historical perspectives about the water system for the Greater Victoria area are available online.

Mount Wells Regional Park

Mount Wells Regional Park is in the Goldstream neighborhood of Langford, B.C. There are two view points from the summit both with excellent views to the east toward Victoria, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Mt Baker in Washington State. Mount McDonald lies to the immediate west of Mt Wells and is part of the Sooke Hills Wilderness Park. The park is about one hundred and twenty three hectares of steep terrain with second growth Douglas fir trees. The main trail in the park is well trodden trail and about one and half kilometers long. This dirt and rock path leads to the three hundred and fifty two meter summit of Mt Wells. The trail starts at the parking area on Humpback Road near the Humpback Reservoir. The Sooke Flowline, an old one and half meter diameter water pipe is along the route and there are a couple of sets of staircases with about seven steps a piece. Once you are east of Humpback Road the trail is challenging. There are several steep sections through the ferns, salal and ocean spray plants that grow in the Douglas fir and Garry oak forest. The trail over the exposed granite rocks, in the upper section on the northwest side of the mountain, is bordered with metal and chain fencing to help protect the slopes from errant hikers. The summit has some grass covered areas that grow on a thin layer of soil; trod with care. Arbutus trees and a few manzanita shrubs can also be found along the slopes. There are camas, shooting stars and stain flowers growing in the spring time, as well as, if you tread with care, prairie lupines. The smaller knoll near the summit of Mount Wells is at about two hundred and ninety meters while the peak for the mountain is another three hundred meters southward. Mount Wells can also be accessed the trail from Raven View Park. Several parks like Cressida, Harlequin, Amy Pond and Turner’s Bog are near by as are several smaller green spaces in the Goldstream neighborhood.

Geographic location N48° 26’52” W123°33’17”

Mt Wells Regional Park can be reached from the Trans Canada Highway also called Hwy1. Turn at West Shore Parkway and turn right onto Amy Road which merges to become Sooke Lake Road. Continue along SLR to reach Humpback Road. Follow Humpback Road past the junction with Irwin Road and look for the parking lot on the left. Humpback Road is rather narrow and winds through the area to connect with Sooke Road. There is limited roadside parking this area.

The Capital Regional District website has information and a map for Mount Wells and several good guide books contain information about this large park.